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Posts Tagged ‘whittling’

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Mt friend and Little Bird collector, Gail, gave me some wise feedback about booth signage in response to yesterday’s post. I took Julie out to lunch and got her approval, as well.  Here is how they looked when I framed them this morning.

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Tom Park Trout Flies

You can review our email invite with photos of artwork here.

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Narwhals, birds and octopi seem to have a special place in the DIY movement.  I’ve not tackled an octopus, but I’ve been turning out narwhals.

When I was very young, my father and I toured the Bowdoin, an early sailing arctic exploration schooner.  The handrail down the main gangway was a narwhal tusk.  That tusk made an impression on me that stuck.

When I began selling my work at DIY shows last year I was again exposed to the wonder of narwhals in the artwork of Sally Harless.  (Actually I first saw her work at IndyFringe.)  I purchased a mug and it’s been in my studio inspiring more narwhals.

This weekend I constructed a family of narwhals.  Here ’tis.

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Class Title:  Creating an Interesting Finish –  Little Bird Carvings
Instructor:  Geoff Davis
Cost:  $60 including materials, $100 combined morning and afternoon sessions
Date and Time:  Saturday, August 7,  1:00 – 5:00
Location:  Judge Stone House – Woodworking Studio, 107 S. 8th Street,  Noblesville, Indiana
Registration:  Call (317) 565-7132 and leave a message.  You will receive a confirmation call.
Class Limit:  8 Students

Skill Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Class Description:

Geoff Davis carves little birds.  Last year he pledged 50 to help the Folk School to raise money for construction and technology costs.  Since this time he’s carved and painted nearly 100 little birds.

In his unique style influenced by folk carvers such as Charles Hart and Wilhelm Schimmel, Geoff carves and paints the birds that are a part of his life using simple and inexpensive tools and materials.

Join Geoff for an afternoon discussing an exploring the many steps to producing a distressed finish using a combination of modern and traditional finishes. Geoff’s finishes have a rich depth and luster that invites observers to handle and rub his work.

Students may bring their own carved and unfinished birds to be decorated.  Students who do not have a carved bird may purchase flatties (unpainted 2-dimensional cutouts) for $5 each.

Combine this class with a carving class the same morning.  You will save money and have a bird ready to paint.

This class often fills quickly.  Register soon.

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Class Title:  Carving Little Birds – An Introduction to Whittling
Instructor:  Geoff Davis
Cost:  $60 including materials, $100 combined morning and afternoon sessions, basic carving knife $20
Date and Time:  Saturday, August 7,  8:00 – 12:00
Location:  Judge Stone House – Woodworking Studio, 107 S. 8th Street,  Noblesville, Indiana
Registration:  Call (317) 565-7132 and leave a message.  You will receive a confirmation call.
Class Limit:  8 Students

Skill Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Class Description:

Geoff Davis carves little birds.  Last year he pledged 50 to help the Folk School to raise money for construction and technology costs.  Since this time he’s carved nearly 100 little birds.

In his unique style influenced by folk carvers such as Charles Hart and Wilhelm Schimmel, Geoff carves the birds that are a part of his life using simple and inexpensive tools and materials.

Join Geoff for a morning of old time whittling as he he guides you through  carving a five inch songbird from white pine using simple knives and gouges.

Each student will leave class with a their own songbird carving and the knowledge and skills to begin to tackle other carving and whittling projects on their own.  Additional carving blanks will be available for purchase.

On the afternoon following this class Geoff will be teaching Painting and Distressing Little Bird Carvings.

This class often fills quickly.  Register soon.

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The theme of the day was HOT — dripping, stinking, mind numbing hot — and we were inside.  The AC was on and it was considerably cooler inside…but it was hot.  Outdoor vendors and bands are to be commended.

It was a great show!  Neal and Amanda continue to improve on an already proven formula.  You know things are done well when so many of the vendors and buyers come from out of town.

We had loads of family on hand.  My stepdaughter, Emily Vance (Brainchild Designs) sells with me, My daughter, Phoebe performed with Molly Grooms (Pholly), Hannah watched the door for the first two hours, my very patient wife, Julie, helped me and Phoebe’s friend, Evan Slusher, came along to entertain Phoebe and help out where he could.

The highlights are always the folks that we meet along the way.  We met a great lady that wants us to visit in Milwaukee (Hells ya!).  An adorable and creative young couple were so sweet and engaging that we slipped a bird into their bag (It was a little more complicated than that, but you get it, right?).  My favorite regulars came by and added to their collections.  We talked birds, children, music and art all day!

Heat and beer weren’t always a good combination.  A gentleman decided that the 1920s Roy Smeck Vita Uke, behind my booth, was for public playing.  When I raced over to save it he let me know that it sounded good EVEN for a uke.

Another highlight was the trip home.  The kids were in a second car.  We were in touch via cell phone.  The plan was to meet in Fountain Square for dinner.  They got turned around in the storm and ended up in a variety of different and interesting places.  By the time we pulled things together we ate at a big box steakhouse in Noblesville (very, very late).  At some point in the trip the kids had gassed up in Greenfield!

I was not the oldest vendor or the only male vendor at this show! Hurray for diversity!

Unsold merchandise will start showing up on Etsy tonight or tomorrow.  There may be as many as 30 new pieces.

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